25 by-laws in force at Leeds Bradford Airport which you must obey or face court

Don't fall foul of these bye-laws at Leeds Bradford Airport
Don't fall foul of these bye-laws at Leeds Bradford Airport

Going on holiday is a time of adventure and joy - but it can quickly take a turn for the worse if you get on the wrong side of the strict laws governing airports and flights.

While an airport is no different to any other place in that the normal laws governing our lands still apply, there are also specific by-laws (or bye-laws) which are put in place specifically for Leeds Bradford Airport and its grounds.

The following 25 by-laws are in place at Leeds Bradford Airport, put in law under the Airports Act 1986.

The laws cover lots of offences, including tampering with conveyor belts, climbing ANY walls or fences, or permitting a dog to enter restricted areas.

Some are obvious and similar to our normal road laws - such as failing to report an accident or driving recklessly - but others, like misusing lifts, are more obscure.

The 25 by-laws governing Leeds Bradford Airport

1. Intentionally obstructing or interfering with proper use of the airport

2. Intentionally obstructing any person acting in the execution of his duty relating to the airport

3. Failing to comply with any notice prohibiting or restricting access to any building, road or any part of the airport

4. Allowing any vehicle, animal or thing to be on the airport after having been required to remove it or after its presence on the airport has been forbidden by a constable or an airport official

5. Boarding or climbing upon or attempting to board or climb upon any aircraft without the authority of the person in charge of it

6. Intentionally operating any switch or lever of any escalator lift or door upon or near which is displayed a notice that it is intended only to be operated in an emergency

7. Tampering with, interfering with or misusing any lift, escalator, conveyor belt, power operated gangway or any mechanical or electronic equipment

8. Tampering with, interfering with or misusing any apparatus provided for transmitting and receiving messages with the exception of offences under the Telecommunications Act 1984

9. Smoking in or otherwise bringing or lighting any naked light into or in any place where any such act is prohibited by notice

10. Climbing any wall, fence, barrier, railing or post

11. On the Airport Apron, throwing, leaving or dropping anything capable of causing injury to any person or property

12. Intentionally giving a false fire, ambulance, bomb warning or other emergency alarm by any means

13. Failure to place an aircraft or any device, appliance or other thing incidental or ancillary thereto in the place and position appointed for that purpose by the Airport Managing Director or a person authorised by him in that behalf

14. Failure properly to moor or otherwise secure any stationary aircraft which is not in a hangar

The following by-laws cover driving and motor vehicles inside the airport:

15. On parts of the airport to which the road traffic enactments do not apply, driving or placing a vehicle carelessly or recklessly or without due consideration for persons using the airport

16. On parts of the airport to which the road traffic enactments do not apply, failure by the driver of a vehicle to stop when required by a constable or airport official to do so

17. On parts of the airport to which the road traffic enactments do not apply, failure by the driver of a vehicle which is involved in an accident to give his name and address and the name and address of the owner of the vehicle to any person having reasonable grounds for requiring them

18. On parts of the airport to which the road traffic enactments do not apply, failure by the driver of a vehicle forthwith to stop after any accident occurs and report the accident to a constable or to the Airport Managing Director as soon as reasonably practicable and in any event before leaving the airport

19. On parts of the airport to which the road traffic enactments do not apply, failure by the driver of a vehicle to comply with any direction for the regulation of traffic given by a constable or a traffic sign

20. On parts of the airport to which the road traffic enactments do not apply, parking a vehicle elsewhere than in a place provided for that purpose

21. On parts of the airport to which the road traffic enactments do not apply, failure by the person in charge of a vehicle to remove it from any parking place when required to do so

22. On parts of the airport to which the road traffic enactments do not apply, leaving or parking a vehicle in excess of the permitted time in an area where the period of waiting is restricted by notice

And these cover other miscellaneous offences at the airport:

23. i. permitting a dog to enter or remain on any part of the airport where to do so is prohibited by notice; (ii) permitting a dog to enter or remain on any other part of the airport unless the dog is held on a lead and is restrained from behaviour giving reasonable grounds for annoyance

24. Soliciting funds or contributions of any kind with the exception of offences under the Vagrancy Act 1824

25. Failure to comply with any request by a constable or an airport official to leave the airport or any particular part thereof or to state name and address and the purpose of being on the airport provided that such airport official shall provide written evidence of his authority if required to do so

What's the punishment for breaking a bye-law?

According to the National Association of Local Councils:

"A failure to obey a byelaw is a criminal offence. As with other crimes, an offender should normally be reported to the police, although it may often be appropriate first to ask the offender not to repeat the offence. Anecdotal evidence gathered by NALC suggests that the police are often reluctant to prosecute the breach of a byelaw. This is partly because of the difficulty of getting evidence. If a council reports a breach to the police it should also give them the names of any witnesses who are prepared to attend court to give evidence.

"The normal penalty for infringing a byelaw is a fine. S.237 of the 1972 Act provides that the maximum fine is the sum fixed by the enactment empowering the making of the byelaw or, if no sum is so fixed, the sum of £50.

"For a continuing offence, an offender may in addition be fined up to £5 a day for each day that the offence continues after conviction (s.237, the 1972 Act). 20. Generally, the maximum penalty for breach of a car parking order is a fine at level 3 on the standard scale (currently £1,000); for breach of an Order of Limitation"